Monday, May 13, 2013

Summer dress 2013; drafting from a dress


Every summer I make myself a new dress. It has to be cool, it has to have pockets, it has to cover my unsightly bits, it has to be wash and wear, and usually ends up being inspired by some strange novelty fabric.

This summer, there are many to choose from, but for this specific item, the winner is


WOOD! 
Since it's a really veritical print, I'm going with the boxy top/gathered skirt design. Few if any darts (none visible), straight up and down. I'm pretty straight up and down, so this works for me.

I'm drafting from a loved dress that has some issues (the back is too wide, I spend too much time pulling up the sleeve caps). I've turned it inside out (the better to read the seams on a busy fabric) and laid it out so I can trace onto flimsy to make a sketch pattern.

Bringing in the back  but maintaining sleeve head.

Measuring the skirt.


The dress removed, I'll tidy up the lines.
And remember to date the piece.

I've folded it in half along the back seam/fold line.

And traced the front to match it, changing the neckline. Going with the same one; it was flattering but not gappy. Seam binding to finish neckline. 


Drafting the sleeve from the armsceye.  I've mirrored the outer end so I have the same distance, just flipped the way I know it should go.

I am going to add seam allowances and front facings and tidy up the sleeve (retrace with a sloper I have for reference). 

I should mention I am as flat as a board, so I don't need darts. It will button down the front, and have patch pockets that I will match and cut when the dress is done (so I put them in the good spots AFTER the skirt is lightly gathered). This means: I put on the dress and put my hands where I want the pockets to go. I need to leave enough fabric to at least try to match the print.

I will add two darts in the back of the gathered skirt; the Textile Studio Brussels pull on skirt does this, and it's a habit I have hung onto. It takes some of the fullness out, smooths it out in back a little, and hides well in a vertical print, such as this one.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Thanks thanks thanks. Together, we can make more better makes. You know what I mean, clever you!